How To Land a Startup Job in Australia

How to land a startup job in Australia

How To Land a Startup Job in Australia

[vc_row][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]How to land a startup job in Australia

 

Landing a startup job is a dream come true for many. Since Australia is home to many prominent startups — Canva and Afterpay are two among them; not to mention the more established brands, such as Atlassian, Envato, Big Commerce, Freelancers and 99Designs — a lot of people (especially Millenials) aspire to go to Australia for startup employment purposes.

With Australian fintech (financial technology) scene on the rise — going toe-to-toe with Singapore I believe — many had predicted that this trend of Australia moving toward being a “startups mecca” would continue into foreseeable future, making immigration to Australia even more appealing to startup job seekers.

Is this you?

Read on to know how you can land a startup job in Australia.

First Thing First, How to Apply For That Startup Job?

It’s a fact that startups hire aggressively and diversely (across nations) to keep their engine running. More often than not, the talents they need are not readily available on the local job market. As a result, they turn to overseas talent pool. This is an advantage for job seekers as the startup job market in Australia is always open for them.

Unlike in the past–where it’s the job seeker’s duty to try to find a company he/she could work for–nowadays, you can highly increase your chance of employment simply by making it easier for those companies to “find” you.

How? The easiest way would be to have a distinguished personal brand in form of social media or other forms of web presence.

Many websites are specifically made for that purpose, the most prominent among others is LinkedIn.

STEP 1: COVER YOUR BASICS

1. Create an account/profile in LinkedIn

LinkedIn profile of Melanie Perkins, the founder of Canva. Hope she doesn't mind.

LinkedIn profile of Melanie Perkins, the founder of Canva. Hope she doesn’t mind.

Many people don’t know what to do with LinkedIn. So they just register and then move along.

Let me tell you something. LinkedIn is not a website that you could just set and forget. It is not a web app where you can just put your photo (not even the best one), fill a minimum amount of details  and…done with it. No. LinkedIn is and will always be–despite whatever fancy name attached to it–a SOCIAL MEDIA. It’s a social media aiming to create a networking between professionals. Therefore, treat it as you would your Facebook/Instagram/Twitter accounts: fill in as many details about you as possible (no personal stuffs please) and then go ahead, socialize and connect. That’s what LinkedIn is for. Trust me: a complete LinkedIn bio can really make a difference to your professional lives.

Tips:

  • Seek people with similar education background
  • Connect with those with similar occupation/skills (e.g. marketing, IT etc)
  • Connect with notable names/brands in your verticals/industries
  • Startups usually announce openly that they’re hiring. Make them your target LinkedIn network
Caution: Don't be too obvious that you're looking for a job in your profile/status, especially if you're still under employment.

Not only that, but LinkedIn also offers some features that are beneficial for job seekers:

  • LinkedIn Job Search (more about this below)
  • the long post feature (where you can show off your writing ability or knowledge on subjects specific to your skills).
  • This thing called LinkedIn Network Effect. Go to Miles Burke’s personal blog to learn more about it.

In recent years, it has become a standard practice for headhunters (job recruiters) to use LinkedIn to find suitable candidates. This could be you, so it’s important that they can find you there.

2. Create a killer CV/Resume

CV or resume is the only detailed information from which your future employer is going to learn about your experience. Straight from the horse’s mouth or so to speak. So, make it worthy. Impress them. Make your CV stands out. Strengthen it with an impressive cover letter and don’t be afraid to go out of the proverbial box.

We’re talking about startups here. If there are things that they love and appreciate, innovation, creativity and wit are definitely among them. What one Nina Mufleh did in 2015 is just an example. Instead of crafting the “usual” CV (yaawwn), she went the extra miles by creating a micro-site about why AirBnB should hire her. As the result, the top brasses at the online booking startup responded to her directly (and very publicly, I might add). You can see her “resume” here: http://www.nina4airbnb.com/is

3. Improve your English proficiency

Australia is an English-speaking country. It’s a no-brainer that every plan to emigrate to Australia to work or study should include a planned action to improve your English, both speaking and writing. That is super-important, especially now that the Government has tightened the requirement on English proficiency on jobs that probably you’re after. Study, practice (a whole lot of them) and ready yourself for IELTS test.

STEP 2: START LOOKING FOR THAT STARTUP JOB

4. Find some reputable sites that provide startup job vacancies in Australia.

While you’re covering your basic, you can also start canvassing these sites for available jobs:

  • https://angel.co/australia/jobs–> You can create a profile and connect with other startup communities in AngelList
  • https://au.linkedin.com/jobs/startup-jobs–>LinkedIn relatively new business model that bypasses recruiters/job marketplace. You can create a custom alert to notify you when your dream job (e.g. copywriter, product manager, junior/senior developer etc) is available, both company-wise or position-wise.
  • https://au.jora.com/Startup-jobs-in-Australia–>Has a huge list of available jobs in Australia.
  • https://www.seek.com.au/startup-jobs –>The most famous job marketplace in Australia.
  • https://www.adzuna.com.au/startup –>Provide job listing for Australia in general, including startups
  • https://www.techinasia.com/jobs?query=Australia–>Have a limited list but high-quality job offers.

5. Network, Network, Network

This is an age where every method of connection can be fruitful, even (or especially?) the remote ones. By that we mean every type of communications that you prefer to connect to other people. No matter what they are: emails, comment sections or messaging apps.

Make a shortlist of people or companies that you aspire to work with/for and reach out to them. Build a connection and let them know about your skills, ability or your willingness to get a new challenge in Australia (it’s not the same with being too obvious that is aforementioned above).

Next: Plan and Prepare for Your Work Visa

Now that you’ve covered your basics, it’s time to plan and prepare for your Australian working visa application. Depending on whether you’ve found an employer during the process above or not, here are your options:

Australia Work Visas For Startup

Skilled migration visa options

This skilled visa is eligible for skilled workers overseas (you) whose skills listed as needed in Australia.

Sponsored or nominated work visa options

You can take this option if fortunately, a startup is willing to sponsor you (because you’re the best candidate for the position they offer).

– Working Holiday Visa

This is another option that we will discuss in another article.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]

Applying for Australian Working Visa: Where to Start?

1. Study this working visa comparison table:

Employer sponsored categories comparison chart

Visa  typeVisa durationSkillSelect expression of interest (EOI) requiredSponsorship requiredRequired
to work
in
regional
Australia
Points-tested visaSkill/qualification requirementsOther eligibility requirements
Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457)From one day up to four yearsSkillSelect EOI is optional for this visaYes, by an employerNo, unless approved prior to September 2009 under regional certification arrangementNoOccupation must be on the list of eligible skilled occupations and applicant must have the skills necessary to perform the occupation. Applicant must also have the necessary English language skills unless exemptedAfter a period of employment of two years in the same position an employer may be able to sponsor a subclass 457 visa holder through the Temporary Residence Transition stream under ENS or RSMS (see below)
Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa (subclass 186)PermanentSkillSelect EOI is optional for this visaYes, by an employerNoNoRequire a skills assessment by the relevant Australian authority and three years’ work experience, unless exempt Relevant registration or licensing must be held if requiredOccupation must be on the list of eligible skilled occupations. Employee is to be paid at least the same as an Australian in the same occupation in the same location

Must be:

  • Under 50, unless exempt
  • Have at least competent
  • English, unless exempt
Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) visa (subclass 187)
Direct Entry stream
PermanentSkillSelect EOI is optional for this visaYes, by a regional employerYesNoMust have a related Australian or overseas equivalent qualification or be exempt Overseas qualified trades workers will need to have their skills assessed by Trades Recognition Australia
Relevant registration or licensing must be held if required
Occupation must be an ANZSCO skill level 1-3. Employee is to be paid at least the same as an Australian in the same occupation in the same location

Must be:

  • Under 50, unless exempt
  • Have at least competent
  • English, unless exempt

Points tested skilled migration comparison chart

Visa
type
Visa
duration
SkillSelect
expression
of interest
(EOI) required
Sponsorship
required
Required
to work in
regional
Australia
Points
tested
visa
Skill/qualification
requirements
Other eligibility
requirements
Skilled – Independent visa (subclass 189)PermanentSkillSelect EOI is mandatoryNoNoYesNominated occupation must be on the list of eligible skilled occupations and skills assessed by relevant assessing authorityMust be:

  • Invited to apply
  • Under 50
  • Have at least competent English
Skilled – Nominated visa (subclass 190)PermanentSkillSelect EOI is mandatoryYes, applicant must be nominated by a state/territory governmentNoYesNominated occupation must be on the list of eligible skilled occupations and skills assessed by relevant assessing authorityMust be:

  • Invited to apply
  • Under 50
  • Have at least competent English
Skilled – Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489)
Sponsored
Up to four yearsSkillSelect EOI is mandatory unless renewing a provisional visaYes, applicant must be sponsored by an eligible relativeYesYesNominated occupation must be on the list of eligible skilled occupations and skills assessed by relevant assessing authorityMust be:

  • Invited to apply
  • Under 50
  • Have at least competent English
Skilled – Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489)
State or territory nominated
Up to four yearsSkillSelect EOI is mandatory unless renewing a provisional visaYes, applicant must be nominated by a state/territory governmentYesYesNominated occupation must be on the applicable list of eligible skilled occupations and skills assessed by relevant assessing authorityMust be:

  • Invited to apply
  • Under 50
  • Have at least competent English

 

Australian Working visa Charts: Source

2. Find which visa from above that you think is the most beneficial for your situation. Many startup job in Australia relies on the 457 visa, that the Government is going to completely remove in March 2018.

3. Consult with a registered migration agent about your visa options and the time frame needed.

4. Prepare all the documents needed as advised by the agent and have them checked before you lodge your visa application. The same thing goes for any test/assessment (i.e. the English proficiency test and skill assessment).

5. Apply (lodge) your visa application.

CONCLUSION

Startup job is the same with any other job really. Said no one ever…

Notwithstanding the difference, if you’re a foreign worker, the preliminary processes you have to take is pretty much the same with “conventional” workers. There’s a lot of preparations to do, both personally and professionally.

In the meantime, Australian government has decided to tighten the way startup companies used to acquire talents from abroad. That change affects thousands of, among others, web developers, market analysts and ICT support technicians; in short, every programmer and growth hacker every startup needs to have.

However, don’t let that deter you. Working in a startup can be very rewarding: the perks (especially if you’re that into ping-pong), the opportunities, the challenge and, of course, the bragging right the lifetime value of such experience. Working in a company or a firm that has a high chance to change how people live their life can be really fulfilling. Inspiring. Highly satisfying. If that’s really something you really aspire, you should strife for doing the best because the process starts far before you even set your feet on Australian ground.

It’s important, therefore, to come up with a strategy to gain entry to a highly rewarding Australian working experience.

Disclaimer

“The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in this post belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to Active Migration Australia. This post is not intended to be, and therefore, should not be regarded as, a legal advice on Australia immigration. For legal advice, please contact our registered migration agent on the contact provided.”

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